Printing glassy metals

2021-08-13

A team led by Martin Sahlberg, Centre for Neutron Scattering, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, have been using additive manufacturing (3D-printing) to investigate the conditions of glassy metal. The findings suggest that the metal (AMLOY-ZR01) would be a good candidate for windows etc. 

an illustrative example of objects that can be made in glassy metal
Example of a complex object that 
can now be made in glassy metal.

A study has just been published on glassy metals. The team led by Martin Sahlberg, Centre for Neutron Scattering, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry, at Uppsala University, has been preparing these by additive manufacturing (also known as 3D-printing) and aimed to investigate what conditions could lead to crystallisation. Small-angle scattering could follow this process but led to a further important discovery. Overall scattering from the material is low and the transmission is high. This makes the metal (AMLOY-ZR01) and the process a good candidate to produce windows and other, even complex, components of neutron instrumentation.

More details can be found in:

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